Happy 234th Marines

Tuesday, November 10, 2009 \PM\.\Tue\.

On November 10, 1775 the United States Marine Corps came into being:

“Resolved, That two Battalions of marines be raised, consisting of one Colonel, two Lieutenant Colonels, two Majors, and other officers as usual in other regiments; and that they consist of an equal number of privates with other battalions; that particular care be taken, that no persons be appointed to office, or inlisted into said Battalions, but such as are good seamen, or so acquainted with maritime affairs as to be able to serve to advantage by sea when required: that they be inlisted and commissioned to serve for and during the present war between Great Britain and the colonies, unless dismissed by order of Congress: that they be distinguished by the names of the first and second battalions of American Marines, and that they be considered part of the number which the continental Army before Boston is ordered to consist of.”

You cannot exaggerate about the Marines. They are convinced to the point of arrogance, that they are the most ferocious fighters on earth- and the amusing thing about it is that they are.
Father Kevin Keaney
1st Marine Division Chaplain
Korean War


Gather Us In?

Tuesday, November 10, 2009 \PM\.\Tue\.

Bad Music

Hattip to the eagle-eyed Father Z who found this on Facebook from a group called SLAP (Survivors of Liturgical Abuse in Parishes).

Gather Us In […to the tune of, that is!]

Here in this place, our comfortable parish,
All of the statues carried away,
See in each face a vacuous visage,
Brought here by guilt or by R.C.I.A.

Gather us in, by Beemer or Hummer,
Gather us in, so we can feel good,
Come to us now in this barren Zen temple,
With only a shrub and an altar of wood.

We are the young, our morals a mystery,
We are the old, who couldn’t care less,
We have been warned throughout all of history,
But we enjoy this liturgical mess.

Gather us in, our radical pastor,
Gather us in, our unveiled nun,
Call to us now, with guitars and bongos,
Hang up your cellphones and join in the fun! Read the rest of this entry »


A Moment of Truth for Pro-Lifers?

Tuesday, November 10, 2009 \PM\.\Tue\.

“Progressives” all over the Internet are absolutely dismayed over the Stupak amendment, but they way in which they are expressing it is rather curious. Rather than standing up and proudly defending a woman’s right to murder her unborn child – or even to, in the more clinical and dehumanizing language, “terminate her pregnancy” – they are chiefly complaining about the class discrimination they believe is inherent in the amendment. Allegedly the Stupak amendment will only make it harder for poor and middle class women to get abortions, while rich women will continue to have access to them.

This distraction is as old as it is absurd. No one objects to abortions for the poor while supporting abortions for the rich. It’s easier for a rich person to buy drugs, to hire hit-men to take out an annoying spouse, or to commit any number of crimes against individuals and society. This has never been an argument for legalizing objectionable or violent behavior.

While the moral point the progressives wish to make is bankrupt, their concerns are based on recent and objective analysis of the larger implications of the Stupak amendment. If Stupak remains in the health care bill, it will actually have the effect of significantly reducing the abortion rate.

Read the rest of this entry »


“Your position is unacceptable to the Church”

Tuesday, November 10, 2009 \PM\.\Tue\.

Bishop Tobin

Faithful readers of this blog will recall this post here  discussing the Bishop of Providence Thomas J. Tobin taking Patrick Kennedy, Teddy’s son, to task for attacking the Church over ObamaCare.  Now the Bishop has written the following letter to Congressman Kennedy:

Dear Congressman Kennedy:

“The fact that I disagree with the hierarchy on some issues does not make me any less of a Catholic.” (Congressman Patrick Kennedy)

Since our recent correspondence has been rather public, I hope you don’t mind if I share a few reflections about your practice of the faith in this public forum. I usually wouldn’t do that – that is speak about someone’s faith in a public setting – but in our well-documented exchange of letters about health care and abortion, it has emerged as an issue. I also share these words publicly with the thought that they might be instructive to other Catholics, including those in prominent positions of leadership.

For the moment I’d like to set aside the discussion of health care reform, as important and relevant as it is, and focus on one statement contained in your letter of October 29, 2009, in which you write, “The fact that I disagree with the hierarchy on some issues does not make me any less of a Catholic.” That sentence certainly caught my attention and deserves a public response, lest it go unchallenged and lead others to believe it’s true. And it raises an important question: What does it mean to be a Catholic? Read the rest of this entry »


The Banal Evils of the Police State

Tuesday, November 10, 2009 \AM\.\Tue\.

With the twentieth anniversary of the fall of the Berlin Wall, many who lived under the communist regime of East Germany have taken the opportunity to go to the state archives and view the files which the Stasi secret police kept on them. Stasi files were not kept only on spies and political dissenters, but on ordinary people whose “offenses” were almost shockingly mundane, and whose betrayers were often friends or family:

A West German pudding. That was all it took. Once the Stasi found out about it, a family breadwinner was fired from his army job and an East German household was plunged into destitution.

Even worse, the family later found out that they had been turned in by a close friend. “She was watering the plants and went through the cupboards to find a Dr. Oetker dessert,” Vera Iburg, who has worked with files kept by the East German secret police for the last 20 years, told SPIEGEL ONLINE, referring to the snoop. “What was she doing? She had no business there!”

It’s an interesting example of the corrupting power of temptation that the availability of the means to easily hurt those around you by reporting others to the police motivated many to inform merely for the satisfaction of it: Read the rest of this entry »


Nidal Malik Hasan: What Did the Feds Know Prior to the Massacre?

Tuesday, November 10, 2009 \AM\.\Tue\.

Lots of disturbing facts coming out as to information possessed by the Federal government about  the alleged shooter Nidal Malik Hasan prior to the Fort Hood Massacre.

1.    Internet postings:   At least six months ago Hasan came to the attention of law enforcement authorities regarding internet postings about suicide bombings. 

2.    Attempts to contact al-Qaeda:  US intelligence officials knew for months that Hasan was attempting to contact al-Qaeda operatives.  Apparently the Army was informed of these attempts by Hasan to contact al_Qaeda.  The inquiry was dropped last year because the feds decided that there was no indication he would become violent.  (I guess they were wrong about that.)

3.    Comments made to fellow officers:  Colonel Terry Lee who worked with Hasan makes clear in the above video that Hasan was not shy about making pro-jihadi comments to other officers.    At Walter Reed he gave a lecture to dozens of doctors in which he said that non-believers in Islam should be beheaded and boiling oil forced down their throats (presumably before the beheading), in addition to being condemned to Hell.  For good measure he also said that unbelievers should be set on fire, although after the the boiling oil and the beheading that strikes me as redundant.  I find it difficult to believe that Hasan’s superiors would not have been aware of this type of behavior by him.

4.    Attempts to proselytize: Hasan was disciplined at Walter Reed for attempting to proselytize his Muslim faith to patients and colleagues. Read the rest of this entry »