Weekend Baroque

Friday, September 3, 2010 \PM\.\Fri\.

I have been listening to an awful lot of Baroque music lately, as my Facebook friends know well 🙂 These pieces will be old news to them, having already been edified by my musical selections over the last few weeks. But now I share them with you, as representatives of the greatest musical tradition in history. Let the musical fascism commence!

1. Antonio Vivaldi: Viola D’Amore Concerto in D Minor (RV 540). I love the sound of the viola d’amore. Few composers wrote music for it at all, and fewer still with the skill of Vivaldi. [A big thank you to Youtube subscriber Harmonico 101 for all of his fantastic uploads as well]

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German Economist: America Is Becoming Too European

Friday, September 3, 2010 \PM\.\Fri\.

I found this piece from the English-language edition of Der Spiegel by University of Hamburg economics professor Thomas Straughaar very interest, in part because it reads very much as written by someone who is looking at American history and culture from the outside, yet trying to understand it for what it is. A key passage from the second page:

This raises a crucial question: Is the US economy perhaps suffering less from an economic downturn and more from a serious structural problem? It seems plausible that the American economy has lost its belief in American principles. People no longer have confidence in the self-healing forces of the private sector, and the reliance on self-help and self-regulation to solve problems no longer exists.

The opposite strategy, one that seeks to treat the American patient with more government, is risky — because it does not fit in with America’s image of itself.

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Religion In the Modern World

Friday, September 3, 2010 \AM\.\Fri\.

Hattip to the ever reticent Lads and Lasses at Lair of the Catholic Cavemen.  Stanford Nutting and his misadventures are brought to you by the ever-talented folks at Theater of the Word Incorporated.   All of this brought me bad flash-backs to the Seventies, when my tuition money was wasted in too many classes conducted as group encounter sessions rather than instruction on the purported subjected matter.    As for religious education, I remember an old priest I knew at the time who told me that most religious instruction as then constituted would come close to mortal sin if the extreme stupidity behind it did not vitiate the necessary mental state.  I do not think that the situation has improved overall in either sacred or profane education.


Man vs. Nature?

Friday, September 3, 2010 \AM\.\Fri\.

In my latest piece at IC, I examine the inhuman agenda behind the fight against “climate change.”

Read it here!


Filial Responsibility Laws and the Fourth Commandment

Friday, September 3, 2010 \AM\.\Fri\.

Honor your father and your mother, that you may have a long life in the land the LORD, your God, is giving you. — Exodus 20:12

The Fourth Commandment is most often interpreted as a directive for children to obey their parents and, by extension, for persons of all ages to obey lawful authorities. It has also been interpreted to mean that children remain obligated to respect, honor, and love their parents even after they reach the age of majority and are no longer bound to obey them.

Moreover, other passages in Scripture make it clear that this commandment carries with it a certain level of responsibility to care for parents who have become elderly or disabled:

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