Father Norman Weslin, Champion of the Unborn

Monday, March 8, 2010 \AM\.\Mon\.

There will come a day in this country when future generations will look back on legal abortion with the same shame and abhorrence that we now look upon slavery.  In that future those who stood up for the unborn will be regarded as heroines and heroes.  On that day no name will be more praised than that of Father Norman Weslin.

Father Weslin followed an extremely unlikely path to the priesthood.  Born 80 years ago to Oscar and Hilma Weslin, he was the 16th of 18 children, the first ten of whom died in infancy.  The family lived in Iron City in Michigan’s Upper Peninsula.  A tough land, it often produces tough people, and Norman Weslin was no exception.  Always in trouble in school, a bright spot in his life was his future wife Mary Lou who he met in the fifth grade.   She was Catholic and he was Lutheran, but that made no difference to him.  As they reached high school age she became the center of his life.

At 17 he joined the Army and asked Mary Lou to marry him.  She flatly refused unless he made something of himself.  Perhaps to the astonishment of both of them he did.  He graduated from Officer’s Candidate School in October of 1951 and was commissioned a second lieutenant.  He went on to artillery and missile school at Fort Bliss, Texas.  While there he converted to Catholicism and he and Mary Lou were married.

He then attended Airborne School at Fort Benning, Georgia which began his association with the 82nd Airborne.  Unfortunately, it was here that he began to drink heavily and became, in the words of Father Weslin, for the next twenty years “a hopeless alcoholic”.  While stationed in Panama in 1952 he almost killed Mary Lou while driving drunk.  The doctor treating her after the collision told him that she had suffered a massive brain concussion and was going to die.  A nurse gave him a green scapular and told him to pin it to Mary Lou’s pajamas and pray, “Immaculate Heart of Mary, pray for us, now and at the hour of our death.”  He did so.  Against the odds Mary Lou fully recovered and left the hospital three days later.

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Notre Dame: Where Intellectual Diversity is Dying

Thursday, March 4, 2010 \AM\.\Thu\.

Click above for book information.

Hattip to the Curt Jester. Dr. Charles E. Rice is a Professor Emeritus of Law of the University of Notre Dame.  (He is also a Marine, a retired Lieutenant Colonel in the United States Marine Corps Reserve, so you know he already has a warm spot in my heart.)  He has written 13 books and hundreds of articles.  He helped found the Conservative Party in New York.  He has been a champion of the pro-life cause.  In the old Notre Dame he fit right in.  The new Notre Dame, not so much.

Professor Rice writes a bi-weekly column in the student newspaper, The Notre Dame Observer, entitled Right or Wrong.  Here is a column he wrote recently remembering his late colleague Professor Ralph McInerny.

Recently Professor Rice wrote a column that you will not be reading in the student newspaper.  Here is the column:

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